Archive for September, 2012


Manhood and Womanhood Defined According to the Bible

Click here for a copy: What’s the Difference?: Manhood and Womanhood Defined According to the Bible

The topic of manhood and womanhood is still strongly debated and still greatly impacts our society. For Christians, there is no doubt that the Bible must be the last word. But what does it teach about true manhood and womanhood? And how does its teachings affect our roles in the home, the church and the wider society? Noted pastor, author and Bible scholar John Piper looks at these important questions in a positive, sensitive light–with conclusions that encourage men and women to live out their unique differences in a fulfilling, godly way.

Excerpt

“Over the years I have come to see from Scripture and from life that manhood and womanhood are the beautiful handiwork of a good and loving God.  He designed our differences and they are profound” (p. 13-14).

John Piper examines gender issues from a biblical perspective, showing how the teaching of true biblical manhood and womanhood affects the roles of men and women in the home, the church, and the wider society.

Table of Contents

Foreword By Elisabeth Elliot
1. What’s the Difference?
2. The Meaning of Masculinity
3. The Meaning of Femininity
4. The Biblical Vision of Complementarity
5. A Closing Challenge to Men and Women

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The Wonders of Divine Love By Frederick

Click here for a copy: The Creator and The Creature: The Wonders of Divine Love

Faber says men in the modern era accept God’s existence; but deny His sovereigntyin practice. Though composed in mid-19th century; this book is absolutely on target today, for man’s tendency to arrogate to himself the prerogatives of God, although strong in Faber’s time, is epidemic today. A real eye-opener!

“Faber sketches, in prose that verges on being actually too gorgeous, both “what it is to be a creature” and “what it is to have a creator.” This book is kind of a spirituality of createdness, and succeeds better than any other book I know at showing the implications of the mere existence of God. Faber was so Roman Catholic that he worried the pope, and this book is full of phrases like ”the composition of this work has been a charity towards souls,” which can be a barrier for Protestant readers; but it’s a barrier well worth climbing, because Faber’s gifts are so unique that there’s just not a Protestant Faber out there anywhere.” – Fred Sanders, professor of theology in the Torrey Honors Institute at Biola University

A Review:

This book is amazing–so beautifully explained and prayerfully put together. The language used through out is poetic and evocative of the subject. He uses lots of imagery, drawing correlation between the spiritual world and the natural world, to great effect.

The love of God and reverence for all His creation reverberates through this book, and a lot of it, though it was written long ago, seems completely applicable to the world we live in now. I would recommend this book highly to anyone and everyone!


Click here for a copy: The Difficult Doctrine of the Love of God

The Difficult Doctrine of the Love of God seeks to restore what we have lost. In this treatment of many of the Bible’s passages regarding divine love, noted evangelical scholar D. A. Carson not only critiques sentimental ideas such as “God hates the sin but loves the sinner,” but provides a compelling perspective on the nature of God and why He loves as He does. Carson blends his discourse with discussion of how God’s sovereignty and holiness complete the biblical picture of who He is and how He loves.

The Difficult Doctrine of the Love of God

It makes for an easy read, despite some deep theology.

In doing away with trivialities and cliches, this work gets to the heart of this all-important doctrine of the love of God from an unflinching evangelical perspective. Yet it does so without losing its personal emphasis: for in understanding more of the comprehensive nature of God’s love as declared in His Word, you will come to understand God and His unending love for you more completely.

A Review By Tim Challies

Until I read this book I would not have considered God’s love as a particularly difficult doctrine. The Trinity is a difficult doctrine to understand, impossible even. The eternal nature of God—that is another difficult or impossible one. But the love of God? I wouldn’t have thought of it as such. But this book convinced me otherwise.

Carson begins by outlining five reasons why this is a difficult doctrine. First, he suggests that while most people believe that God is a loving Being, this belief is set within a foundation other than Scripture. Second, many complementary truths about God are disbelieved by many within our culture (and our churches). Third, postmodernism reinforces a sentimental, syncretistic and pluralistic view of God. Fourth, the church has fallen into believing a sentimentalized version of God’s love that is not consistent with God as presented in Scripture. And fifth, the church portrays this as a simple doctrine and overlooks certain important distinctions that prove it to be difficult.

From this foundation, Carson builds the book around four themes: the distortion of the love of God; the fact that God is love; God’s love and God’s sovereignty; and God’s love and God’s wrath. As we would expect from Carson, he goes straight to the source—to God’s revelation of Himself in Scripture—to correct false assumptions and provide a deep discussion of what God’s love entails. He defends the compatibility of seemingly-opposite characteristics of God (that God can be perfectly loving and yet perfectly just in His wrath) and examines how God’s love interacts with His sovereignty in human affairs.

It is rare to find so much depth in such a short book. At the same time it is also nice to be able to learn so much without having to wade through hundreds of pages of text. This book could as easily have been hundreds or thousands of pages long. Carson does a wonderful job of highlighting the most important issues while confining himself to a limited word count. I highly recommend it.


Click here for a copy: A Hermeneutical Manual: Opening Scripture

In his Hermeneutical Manual, Patrick Fairbairn calls readers to a sober examination of the Bible. He follows the historic Protestant practice of allowing the Scriptures to stand as their own witness and interpreter. The author explains the “analogy of faith,” in understanding the Bible. As summarized in the Westminster Confession (1:9), this principle states: “The infallible rule of interpretation of Scripture is the Scripture itself; and therefore, when there is a question about the true and full sense of any Scripture it must be searched and known by other places that speak more clearly.”

Opening Scripture

Patrick Fairbairn (1805-1874) was a gifted and faithful servant of Christ best known for his commentaries and works on Prophecy and Typology. This lesser known work deserves a place alongside those other great works.

Sinclair Ferguson says, “I have a copy of Fairbairn and often wondered why it hasn’t been reprinted . . . I suspect the title has put publishers off (hermeneutical plus manual being a bit much for today’s readers!). I think Fairbairn was really an extraordinarily able man and a great servant of the church.

Roger Nicole contends: “It is high time that in the midst of controversies in which all kinds of accusations are leveled against the use of the Old Testament by New Testament authors the painstaking work of Patrick Fairbairn and his monumental scholarship be once again taken into consideration.”